Common Mistakes: Anger | Reasonable

In this episode, you will learn to identify and fix common mistakes we usually make when we use the words anger and reasonable. After you listen to the episode, you can check your understanding with a short quiz.

Perfect English Podcast Episode 28 Audio

Perfect English Podcast Episode 28 Quiz

0%

Which sentence is correct?

Correct! Wrong!

Reasonable means fair, or acceptable. Rational means produced by means of careful, logical thinking.

Which sentence is correct?

Correct! Wrong!

We say control/keep/lose your temper (NOT anger)

Which sentence is correct?

Correct! Wrong!

Anger is a noun and a verb. Angry is the adjective.

Which sentence is correct?

Correct! Wrong!

When you mean 'fairly/quite', use reasonably (adverb) not reasonable.

Perfect English Podcast Episode 28 - Common Mistakes: Anger | Reasonable Quiz
Perfect English Podcast Episode 28 - Common Mistakes: Anger | Reasonable Quiz

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Episode Transcript

0:12
Welcome to a new episode from perfect English podcast. Today we’re going to talk about some common mistakes and we will focus on two key words anger and reasonable. Let’s start with anger. Let’s take a look at this example. I was surprised and anger that he did not apologize. Anger is a noun and a verb. We say the workers who lost their jobs expressed anger and resentment or the government’s handling of the affair has angered local residents. The adjective is angry. We say some of the women felt angry the way they were treated. We don’t say anger instead of angry. So here we should go back to the sentence and fix it by saying I was surprised and angry. That he did not apologize. Let’s take a look at another example. He will have to learn how to control his anger. Now we say control, keep or lose your temper, not your anger. This is the expression. For example, we say the problem with George is that he can’t control his temper. That means he cannot stop himself from suddenly getting angry. So here, we should go back to the sentence and fix it by saying he’ll have to learn how to control his temper, not control his anger. And now for the next key word, reasonable. Let’s take a look at this example. I was far too upset and emotional to make a reasonable decision. Now reasonable means fair, sensible or acceptable. For example, we say dividing up the work equally seems like a very reasonable decision or they’ll accept any reasonable offer. But the other word we should use here is not reasonable. Actually, it’s right Rational rational means produced by means of careful, logical thinking. So like for example, when we say there must be some rational explanation, things can just disappear. so here if we look back at the example, it is not actually a reasonable decision is not fair, sensible or acceptable decision we’re looking for, we’re looking for a rational decision. So here we should say I was far too upset and emotional to make a rational decision. Let’s take a look at another example. She usually gets reasonable good marks. When you mean fairly or quite we use reasonably the adverb For example, we say the team played reasonably well on Saturday, but something was missing in the attack. so here if we look back, actually this is what we wanted to use reasonable for, we wanted to say fairly or quite so we should say reasonably instead of reasonable we should go back to the sentence and Fix it by saying she usually gets reasonably good marks, not reasonable good marks. And that’s all we have for today. Thanks for watching. I’ll see you in the next episode. I hope you have learned a lot today and I’m pretty sure that your English is a step closer to perfect English. This was your host Danny. Don’t forget to subscribe. I’ll see you next time.

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