Idiomatic Expressions: Being Close to Danger

In this episode from Perfect English Podcast, you will learn some idioms to express situations being close to danger. After you listen, check your understanding with a short quiz.

Perfect English Podcast Episode 26 Audio

Perfect English Podcast Episode 26 Quiz

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Choose the option that best explains the idiom in the following sentence:

We won the match by the skin of our teeth.

Correct! Wrong!

Choose the option that best explains the idiom in the following sentence:

You're taking your life into your hands crossing the road here.

Correct! Wrong!

Choose the option that best explains the idiom in the following sentence:

I prefer getting to the station early, but Lee always cuts things fine.

Correct! Wrong!

Choose the option that best explains the idiom in the following sentence:

The economy is hanging by a thread.

Correct! Wrong!

Choose the option that best explains the idiom in the following sentence:

The crew had a narrow escape when the pilot made a crash landing.

Correct! Wrong!

Perfect English Podcast Episode 27 - Idioms: Being Close to Danger Quiz
Perfect English Podcast Episode 27 Quiz

Perfect English Podcast Featured Image Episode 26

Take this quiz to check your understanding of idioms to talk about being close to danger, which was the content of episode 26 from Perfect English Podcast.

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Episode Transcript

0:12
Welcome to a new episode from perfect English podcast. Today we’re going to talk about some idioms that have to do with being close to danger. We will start with the first idiom for today have a narrow escape. If you have a narrow escape, it means you just managed to avoid danger or trouble. For example, the crew had a narrow escape when the pilot made a crash landing. Now let’s move to the next idiom. Do something by the skin of your teeth. If you do something by the skin of your teeth, it means you only just succeed in doing something. For example, we won the match by the skin of our teeth. That definitely tells you that it wasn’t an easy win. And now for the next idiom Rather or too close for comfort. And we use that to describe something that is so close in distance or similar in amount that you are worried or frightened. For example, we won the election, but the results were rather close for comfort. It wasn’t comfortable when we were worried we wouldn’t win, but we did. And now for the next idiom cut things fine. And that means to leave yourself only just enough time to do something. For example, I prefer getting to the station early, but CLI always cuts things fine. He usually leaves everything to the last minute. And now for another idiom, something sets alarm bells ringing and that means something worries you because it is a sign that there may be a problem. For example, the strange look, she gave me set alarm bells ringing Something is wrong. So we use this expression. And now for another idiom take you Your life in or into your hands. And that means to do something very risky. For example, you’re taking your life into your hands crossing the road here, because it’s very dangerous, you’re doing something very risky. And now for another idiom, your life is in someone’s hands. That means that person can affect whether you live or die. For example, when you go into hospital, you put your life in the hands of strangers, obviously, doctors, nurses, etc. But you put your life in the hands of these people. And now for another idiom that has to do with being close to danger hanging by a thread, and that means likely to fail in the near future. For example, the economy is hanging by a thread that’s not stable, it is likely to fail in the near future, we have to do something about it. And now for one last idiom for today on a knife edge, and that means in a very difficult situation and there Are worries about the future. For example, the business is on a financial knife edge and may go bankrupt. It is close to hanging by a thread. It is not stable, we have to do something about it. It is on a knife edge. And that’s all the idioms I have for one day. Thank you very much. I’ll see you in the next episode. I hope you have learned a lot today and I’m pretty sure that your English is a step closer to perfect English. This was your host Danny. Don’t forget to subscribe. I’ll see you next time.

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